naamahdarling:

wildsoulchiild:

fanofallshippers:

icequeen102990:

glampora:

heytheresuckyq:

findinglady:

PLEASE PASS THIS ON! 
I want to make sure every one knows about this and what it can do to your pets 
this is what has happened to my sisters cat after she wore a hartz flea and tick collar and now has a burn like wound on her neck. please pass this on and do not buy hartz’s products! they use poison in their products pets have died because of this!!
http://www.hartzvictims.org/

Yes this is my cat she is doing fine at the moment but I’m so sorry for the people who’s pets are not so lucky

oh my god
PLEASE REBLOG THIS PEOPLE
save pets!

Hartz is the worse EVER! my aunt used it and it ended up killing two of her cats. only one survived but she had the worse skin condition. NEVER USE HARTZ

BETTER REBLOG THISS!!!

Guys this is an actual issue. We had Hartz collars for my dog and he kept having seizures. one seizure he had on the stairs and fell backwards down the stairs, and he also stop breathing from these seizures. When I found out about Hartz causing this I took it off my dog and he hasn’t had a seizure since. And he used to have one at least every few months. DON’T USE HARTZ.

Yeah, sorry for the picture, folks, but please, y’all gotta know: don’t use Hartz products.  They shouldn’t even be sold.  Shit’s evil.

naamahdarling:

wildsoulchiild:

fanofallshippers:

icequeen102990:

glampora:

heytheresuckyq:

findinglady:

PLEASE PASS THIS ON! 

I want to make sure every one knows about this and what it can do to your pets 

this is what has happened to my sisters cat after she wore a hartz flea and tick collar and now has a burn like wound on her neck. please pass this on and do not buy hartz’s products! they use poison in their products pets have died because of this!!

http://www.hartzvictims.org/

Yes this is my cat she is doing fine at the moment but I’m so sorry for the people who’s pets are not so lucky

oh my god

PLEASE REBLOG THIS PEOPLE

save pets!

Hartz is the worse EVER! my aunt used it and it ended up killing two of her cats. only one survived but she had the worse skin condition. NEVER USE HARTZ

BETTER REBLOG THISS!!!

Guys this is an actual issue. We had Hartz collars for my dog and he kept having seizures. one seizure he had on the stairs and fell backwards down the stairs, and he also stop breathing from these seizures. When I found out about Hartz causing this I took it off my dog and he hasn’t had a seizure since. And he used to have one at least every few months. DON’T USE HARTZ.

Yeah, sorry for the picture, folks, but please, y’all gotta know: don’t use Hartz products.  They shouldn’t even be sold.  Shit’s evil.

pets psa this is important!

Let’s Talk About Siege Warfare, A Masterpost of Sorts, part 2/2

theticklishpear:

This is meant as an information resource for creative folk, not a complete guide. Be sure to supplement this with additional research. Find the rest of the series, including the previous posts on clergynobilitydivinationspirit animalsmythical creaturesstructuring an armymedieval punishmentsarmorpre-gunpowder weapons, and common terms of medieval life.

Some terms in the below list are marked with a (d), indicating an item that was used primarily by the defenders of a fortified area, or an (o), indicating an item used primarily by the attackers. This represents the way various devices were used historically, however they should not act as a restriction to writers.

Ballista: An engine like a large crossbow used to fire heavy javelins, employing twisted skeins of sinew for power. Ballistae were so powerful that a single bolt fired from one could skewer several men and penetrate almost any armor. Such weapons tended to be used as defensive weapons rather than by besiegers because they were not very effective against stone and required less space to operated than catapults. Along with catapults, ballistae were used in virtually every major siege for at least three thousand years. (Greek oxybeles; Latin ballistascorpiocheiroballistra)

Battering Ram (o): A heavy beam used to batter down doors or, more slowly, walls. In its simplest form, it was a big log carried by a dozen soldiers and used to stave in the door of a small castle. In its more complex form, a ram was shod with a wedge-shaped metal head, mounted on a carriage so that it could be swung rhythmically, and either protected by a wheeled shed or mounted within a siege tower. Rams are among the oldest, and the most rudimentary, of siege engines. (Latin testudo)

Read More

seige warfare Resources writing fascinating

Reactions from people whose language I was trying to learn:

fatnajl:

linguisticsyall:

Germans: Oh you’re learning German? Hey, you’re not so bad at it. Don’t fuck it up though. 

French: About time you learned French. 

Russians, Koreans, Spanish-speakers: WOW YOU’RE LEARNING MY LANGUAGE? LET ME HELP YOU I CAN GET SOME MATERIALS FOR YOU AND RECOMMEND SOME SITES AND VIDEOS, DID YOU JUST SAY “HELLO” IN MY LANGUAGE? YOU ARE SO GREAT WOW I AM SO IMPRESSED

Dutch: but why would you do this

why would you do this

(via dduane)

language bless

copperbadge:

copperbadge:

Look who followed me into the cemetery this morning.

"Can I tell the cat story? Can I please?"
"Yes, Sam, you can tell the cat story."
So this morning I was on my way to Copp’s Hill Burying Ground, one of the most historic old cemeteries in Boston, when I met a cat. I was hiking my ass up Hull Street and I noticed a black cat was pacing me across the street. Eventually he followed me up and into the cemetery, where I took the above photo. 
We hung out for a while. I named him Buster. I figured if he turned out to be a she we could call her Busta. He had a little collar covered in skulls with a bell on it, so he clearly is beloved by someone. 
When scifigrl47 and Kate arrived to meet me, I mentioned the cat to them, and a few minutes later he wandered up to us. We made much of him, and Kate tapped one of the grave markers, a big flat one, and asked if he’d jump up onto it so she could photograph him. And he did, we have photos as proof. 
After his little photo shoot, we said goodbye to Buster and walked down the hill to explore more of the cemetery. The former exit at the bottom of the hill is no longer there, so we were coming back up when we noticed two very stylish older women walking two small dogs in the cemetery.
Now:
a) there are two large, very clear signs at the entrance saying NO DOGS. 
b) Who the hell thinks it’s appropriate to walk their dogs in a historic cemetery? Like, ever?
So I’m remarking on the gaucheness of what they’re doing, and we’re about to sort of avoid them, when we realize Buster is still around. And one of the dogs, fortunately on a leash, is freaking the fuck out at him. 
Sci, with more presence of mind than I had, starts off up the hill to make sure the cat is okay, and we’re following her along when we see the one woman bend down and scoop the dog into her arms. I wasn’t sure why she was doing this until I saw Buster hit a four-foot vertical leap and go BANANAS on the woman. 
Not the dog. The woman holding him. 
Buster disapproves of dogs in the cemetery too, and he knows who to blame. 
And we actually cannot believe what we just saw, this perfectly nice cat going after her like that, when the other woman scoops up HER dog and they start bombing for the gate out of the cemetery. They were going pretty much full out and when they hit the gate we realized it was because BUSTER THE TEN POUND CAT was literally chasing them out of the graveyard. And then down the street.
We hit the exit ourselves torn between laughter and utter amazement at this fucking hardcore cat policing his cemetery. There was a woman standing on the sidewalk in her pajamas, probably Buster’s owner, as well as a guy on a scaffold doing tuckpointing who clearly saw the whole thing and was just busting his guts laughing. 
We spent all day talking about that cat. Kate’s convinced he’s not actually a cat, he’s either a shapeshifter or the spirit of a departed revolutionary war hero. I suspect he’s some kind of supernatural entity. 
Buster the cat might just be my spirit animal. 

copperbadge:

copperbadge:

Look who followed me into the cemetery this morning.

"Can I tell the cat story? Can I please?"

"Yes, Sam, you can tell the cat story."

So this morning I was on my way to Copp’s Hill Burying Ground, one of the most historic old cemeteries in Boston, when I met a cat. I was hiking my ass up Hull Street and I noticed a black cat was pacing me across the street. Eventually he followed me up and into the cemetery, where I took the above photo. 

We hung out for a while. I named him Buster. I figured if he turned out to be a she we could call her Busta. He had a little collar covered in skulls with a bell on it, so he clearly is beloved by someone. 

When scifigrl47 and Kate arrived to meet me, I mentioned the cat to them, and a few minutes later he wandered up to us. We made much of him, and Kate tapped one of the grave markers, a big flat one, and asked if he’d jump up onto it so she could photograph him. And he did, we have photos as proof. 

After his little photo shoot, we said goodbye to Buster and walked down the hill to explore more of the cemetery. The former exit at the bottom of the hill is no longer there, so we were coming back up when we noticed two very stylish older women walking two small dogs in the cemetery.

Now:

a) there are two large, very clear signs at the entrance saying NO DOGS. 

b) Who the hell thinks it’s appropriate to walk their dogs in a historic cemetery? Like, ever?

So I’m remarking on the gaucheness of what they’re doing, and we’re about to sort of avoid them, when we realize Buster is still around. And one of the dogs, fortunately on a leash, is freaking the fuck out at him. 

Sci, with more presence of mind than I had, starts off up the hill to make sure the cat is okay, and we’re following her along when we see the one woman bend down and scoop the dog into her arms. I wasn’t sure why she was doing this until I saw Buster hit a four-foot vertical leap and go BANANAS on the woman.

Not the dog. The woman holding him. 

Buster disapproves of dogs in the cemetery too, and he knows who to blame. 

And we actually cannot believe what we just saw, this perfectly nice cat going after her like that, when the other woman scoops up HER dog and they start bombing for the gate out of the cemetery. They were going pretty much full out and when they hit the gate we realized it was because BUSTER THE TEN POUND CAT was literally chasing them out of the graveyard. And then down the street.

We hit the exit ourselves torn between laughter and utter amazement at this fucking hardcore cat policing his cemetery. There was a woman standing on the sidewalk in her pajamas, probably Buster’s owner, as well as a guy on a scaffold doing tuckpointing who clearly saw the whole thing and was just busting his guts laughing. 

We spent all day talking about that cat. Kate’s convinced he’s not actually a cat, he’s either a shapeshifter or the spirit of a departed revolutionary war hero. I suspect he’s some kind of supernatural entity. 

Buster the cat might just be my spirit animal. 

kitty

vixyish:

wolverxne:

Freddy The Fox by: [Rob Lee]

Photographers note: "This brave fox wandered up on our porch. He's half cat, half dog, and all cute. When the fox first came for a visit we instantly named it "Freddy the Fox." But after we got to know it we found out Freddy is actually Frederica."

BABYYYYYY

(You can still call Frederica “Freddy”!)

(Source: WOLVERXNE, via seananmcguire)

Fox cutie

naamahdarling:

feralxbones:

PSA

This is true.  Cats that have been neutered take up resources that would otherwise be used for breeding studs or queens, thus making it more difficult for breedable cats to make their way into a colony.
TNR is a very effective way of managing urban/suburban feral cat colonies, and if you can find a local one to support, I recommend doing so.

naamahdarling:

feralxbones:

PSA

This is true.  Cats that have been neutered take up resources that would otherwise be used for breeding studs or queens, thus making it more difficult for breedable cats to make their way into a colony.

TNR is a very effective way of managing urban/suburban feral cat colonies, and if you can find a local one to support, I recommend doing so.

psa kitty I wish there were a different way of being able to identify them than cutting off their ear though!